Monthly Archives: November 2018

New Therapy for Stubborn Fat: Zeltiq CoolSculpting

Most individuals do not as their love manages. They think that muffin tops belong in a bakeshop. They want their pooch at the end of a leash, not listed below the belly switch. They consume a healthy diet and remain active, yet persistent deposits of fat around the midsection just won’t move. They desire a non-surgical option to obtain their bodies back. Coolsculpting by Zeltiq could be the answer. The method requires no anesthetic.

In the fight of the lump, we have actually tried suction, surgical procedure, sonic waves, and lasers to separate and remove fat cells. Nevertheless, those procedures can harm various other tissues in the body. That suggests healing time afterward, and occasionally unpredictable results. Coolsculpting is an innovative method that doesn’t smash, shed, or remove cells. It safely and conveniently utilizes the body’s all-natural procedures to eliminate targeted locations of fat. The copyrighted Coolsculpting procedure is FDA-cleared.

Is CoolSculpting Highly Safe and Effective?

You rest comfortably while your skin specialist attracts an issue area of fat into the tool with gentle suction, where it is after that cooled. Because fat cells freeze at a greater temperature than skin, you will feel a cold sensation yet the skin is not damaged. Common treatment time is at concerning an hour – your lunch break or the moment you would certainly spend at one gym session. You can take a snooze, deal with your laptop computer, check out, or chat on the phone. There’s no downtime adhering to treatment – you may resume your normal regular right away.

Once the fat cells are crystallized, they pass away over time and are naturally cleared out of your body. Throughout the following couple of months, you’ll see a noticeable decrease in the therapy area. You might intend to arrange additional sessions for other areas of the body or for more reduction. When we reach adulthood, our bodies no more produce new fat cells. For that reason, the reduction is long-term in the dealt with areas, and easily kept with a sensible diet and normal exercise. If you gain weight adhering to Zeltiq CoolSculpting, it will remain in various other, unattended locations.

WC Sailing Team Opens The Season With Third-Place Finish

The sailing team of Washington College opened its season and it finished at the third-place. The total of five teams participated in the event at the Hampton’s Edward Teach Memorial Open and WC came third. In the regatta combined scoring was used that scoring A and B Divisions was calculated together.

Edward Teach Memorial Open (ETMO)

  • The highlights of Washington College

The B Division pair Washington with skipper  Ellie Lienert and Will Sunkler and the skipper duo of A Division  Andrew Vernon and Paul Hart finished in almost similar scores that is 34 and 35, respectively, with Lienert and Sunkler taking the third position in the 10 combined scoring and Vernon and Hart placing fourth.

Lienert and Sunkler finished second in the third as well as sixth races and in the fourth race; they finished in the third position. The best finishes of Vernon and Hart were the second finish in the seventh race.

Notes

  • There were shifty and Light winds on the both days of the regatta and made the condition little challenging for the participants. On Saturday, four races were done and finished and on Sunday three races were raced.
  • Host of the event was Hampton and it was the winner of the regatta.
  • This was the first regatta of Washington raced under the guidance of Bradley Adam, the first-year head coach.

Students shared their experience about the regatta and said, “It was amazing, we enjoyed it thoroughly. The weather was good, but less challenging and this added some difficulties in the race.”

Will Sunkler the skipper said, “Earlier we face difficulty, but then we understood the wind and started sailing confidently. The races without challenges have no fun as we don’t get much opportunity to do something. So, shifty wind made my day.”

Menopause And Osteoporosis – How To Reduce The Risk Of Fractures

Osteoporosis is a silent, insidious disease. It is often undetected until fractures occur – fractures which often result from minimal trauma, or even no trauma at all. It is often exacerbated by menopause. There are many natural supplements that can help to alleviate the symptoms of menopause; and many more that can boost bone health. A good site to find out more about these is Customer Review – and as you read on, you will soon see why you need to take steps to deal with these common health issues sooner rather than later.

According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), osteoporosis is believed to be responsible for more than 2-million fractures in the United States annually, leading to 432 000 hospital admissions, almost 2,5-million medical office visits, and about 180 000 nursing home (frailcare) admissions. In addition, women with hip fractures have an increased mortality of 12 to 20% during the following two years while more than half of all hip fracture survivors are unable to return to independent living.

However, other research indicates that the risk is even higher. It’s estimated that more than 50% of postmenopausal women will have a fracture of some sort between the onset of menopause and death.

As overall longevity increases, osteoporosis researchers generally predict a “dramatic increase” in the number of fractures among postmenopausal women.

The question many researchers and healthcare providers are grappling with is when and how best to treat osteoporosis.

While the risk of osteoporosis was generally defined in terms of bone density in the 1990s, more recent studies have indicated that, while bone density is an important risk factor, clinical risk factors (such as age, weight, personal and family history of fractures, smoking, glucocorticoid use and unsteadiness that can result in falls) are also important.

Pharmacological interventions

There are many medications that are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis and reduce the risk of both vertebral and hip fractures which are said to be effective, affordable and safe. These must be prescribed by a medical doctor.

Bone-healthy lifestyle

Apart from pharmacological and supplement interventions, most researchers agree that lifestyle modifications may improve musculoskeletal integrity, balance, preserve bone strength and prevent future fractures.

According to the 2016 AACE Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) on Postmenopausal Osteoporosis, a bone-healthy lifestyle includes “an adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D,” along with regular exercise to improve strength and balance, not smoking and limited alcohol consumption.

However, this is not as straightforward as it seems, particularly when it comes to calcium and vitamin D.

Natural supplements

Calcium supplementation may slightly increase bone mineral density, and there is research that indicates that it can reduce the risk of fractures by 15%. However, other researchers claim that there is scant evidence that calcium intake influences fracture risk, and it is not included in any of the major fracture risk calculators.

In fact, there are some suggestions that calcium may even increase hip fracture risk and carry other risks such as the formation of kidney stones and stomach upsets.

And then there’s vitamin D which is said to play a major role in calcium absorption and bone health, and may be important in muscle performance, balance and falling risk. It may also enhance the response to prescription anti-osteoporosis treatments, increase bone mineral density and prevent fractures.

Most medical guidelines recommend vitamin D supplementation to ensure intake of between 1 000 and 4 000 IU of vitamin D per day (for people over 50) because of the limited food products that contain sufficient vitamin D.

What about other supplements such as magnesium, vitamins A and K, and so-called “natural estrogens?

The AACE Guideline notes that while many people appear to believe that magnesium is necessary to reduce fracture risk because magnesium is required for adequate calcium absorption, magnesium supplementation does not increase bone mineral density. In addition, there is no evidence that adding magnesium to calcium tablets increases the absorption of calcium.

Vitamin A – if taken in excess – has been shown to have a negative effect on bone. On the other hand, the jury is still out on vitamin K. While some studies have indicated that vitamin K may reduce bone turnover and loss in postmenopausal women, other studies have failed to replicate these findings.

As for isoflavones – natural estrogens – the AACE Guidelines authors state that although these are widely promoted for preventing bone loss and decreasing fracture risk, “there is no conclusive data” to support this.

Three substances which should be avoided – or at least used in limited quantities – are caffeine, alcohol and tobacco.

In addition, there have been numerous studies that clearly indicate that cigarette smoking increases osteoporotic fractures.